Saturday, February 16, 2019

Dr. Chrysann's Spring Clinics 2019 - Call Today to Schedule!


High Desert Veterinary Service

Chrysann Collatos VMD,PhD,DipACVIMLA
                                                                                775-969-3495 (Office)       742-2823 (Cell)
HighDesertEquine.com
Building Healthy Partners

Spring 2018 News & Notes:
Ø Clinic Schedule – Sign up!
Ø Impaction Colic:Winter Hazard
Ø Client Communication:My Role
Hello All –
Are you loving February this year? The weather has been a real challenge for horses and owners.  From freezing cold to weird warm storms, heavy snow, windy rain, ice to floods all increase risks of colic, foot abscesses, traumatic injuries, and loss of condition. 
              Your Spring Clinic appointment is a great opportunity to bring your concerns to my attention and have an important end-of-winter exam performed on your horses.  Schedule today!  
Cheers,
Dr. Chrysann
Spring Clinic Schedule
Routine Spring exams include vaccination,  deworming or fecal examination, dentistry consult, and sheath cleaning. 
To schedule, call 775 969 3495 with:
  • Your Name, Phone # and Clinic Date
  • Number of Animals, and Services
We will return your call three days before your clinic with an estimated time of arrival.
 Have horses caught 30 minutes beforehand!
Location                                                    Date
Rancho Haven/Sierra Ranchos1          Sat Mar 2 
Rancho Haven/Sierra Ranchos2          Fri Mar 23
Red Rock North/Silver Knolls 1            Sun Mar 3
Red Rock North/Silver Knolls 2            Fri Mar 22
Span Springs/Palomino Valley 1          Sat Mar 9
Span Springs/Palomino Valley 2          Fri Mar 15
Antelope/Golden/Lemmon Valley 1   Fri Mar8
Antelope/Golden/Lemmon Valley 2   Sun Mar 17   
South and West Reno                             Fri Mar 1 
South & West Reno                                Sat Mar 16
Discounted prices ONLY AVAILABLE Clinic Day
Farm Call (per location)             $10.00
Wellness Exam (mandatory)     $16.00
West Nile                                        $33.00
FluRhino                                          $30.00
Strangles Intranasal                     $34.00
Rabies                                              $23.00
Tetanus/ Encephalitis                 $19.00
Ivermectin Deworm                    $16.00
Coggins Test                                 $29.00
Sheath Clean w/sedation           $45.00
Fecal parasite exam                    $19.00
Pre-registered microchip            $39.00

Client Communication: My Role
We all have strong emotional ties to our horses.  At the same time, we know that the cost of veterinary care can be a limiting factor in our decisions for our equine partners.  When our horses are sick or injured their welfare is our priority but worry about associated costs also is a painful reality.

My job as your veterinarian is to communicate with you using compassionate yet straightforward language.  By clearly explaining your horse’s problem, the treatment options and their costs, and the prognosis for recovery, I should help you balance your emotional response, and equip you to make informed decisions that are in your horse's best interest while also financially responsible.  

Let’s consider Flash and Mary. Flash lives in a show barn. Mary is a very involved, experienced owner who juggles a heavy schedule, and often is unavailable for my visits with Flash.  She values a complete and prompt report from me to keep her on top of developments and allow her to make appropriate decisions for Flash’s welfare.  I appreciate these qualities because they reflect her concern for her horse and allow us to have an open, productive relationship.

Fulfilling Mary’s expectations was simple after suturing a facial laceration Flash sustained last year.  I left clear, written instructions with Flash’s trainer followed by a phone call to Mary as I departed the barn, assuring her that Flash should recover uneventfully. More recently, Flash developed a lameness that is proving difficult to diagnose.  Now client communication is a critical part of my obligation to Mary. 

After my initial exam I explained the possible causes of Flash's lameness to Mary without overwhelming or confusing her, and then focused on laying out a specific, structured plan explaining how I would use diagnostic nerve blocks and imaging to narrow down these possibilities.  This included a time line, and it addressed Flash's care during that time.  I told Mary that should the diagnosis not become clear once this plan was completed, then we should consider a referral setting where more advanced diagnostics such as MRI, and a board-certified lameness expert, would take the evaluation to the next level.  We reviewed the cost of my work-up, and the costs associated with referral and advanced diagnostics, and discussed the risk-benefit of early referral vs following an initial diagnostic plan at home.

At this point, I asked Mary if she had any questions, and how she wanted to proceed. Mary expressed her confidence that her horse was safe and that with our well-defined time line she was comfortable moving forward with the diagnostic plan at home.  Currently we still have no specific diagnosis for Flash.  I am consulting with a colleague who is an American College of Veterinary Surgery diplomate while Mary continues to balance the value of more advanced diagnostics against the cost, and Flash patiently waits as Mary and I navigate the course of his care together.


Impaction Colic: Winter Hazard
Spring may be around the corner, but right now late winter is slamming us hard, and impaction colic is a real concern.  Impactions are abnormal buildups of food that block transit through the intestinal tract.  The most common location is the large colon, which is 12-15 feet in length and holds 12-16 gallons. The colon varies in size and folds on itself several times.  The pelvic flexure is a sharp turn where the left ventral colon diameter shrinks from 8” to 3”, making it a common site of impaction.

The colon is a large fermentation vat where food material is processed by bacteria and protozoa.  It has a complex electrical system that operates its mixing and moving functions, and state-of-the-art plumbing. The intricacy of the horse’s healthy colon function is amazing, but its complexity also makes it one of the horse’s weakest links.

What can we do to promote a healthy colon? The balance of water and fiber in the colon are the primary determinants of colonic health.
First and foremost, feed a diet consisting of at least 75% high quality hay.  An average #1000-pound horse should eat 15-20 pounds of hay daily. High fiber diets increase colonic water by 30% over high grain diets.  However, the colon has two independently managed phases: solid and liquid.  Over mature, poor quality hay can create a sluggish solid phase which can form an impaction while the mobile liquid phase passes on through.  
Second, provide CLEAN fresh water.  There is evidence that horses prefer lukewarm water.  Researchers have shown that ponies drank 38-41% less water when it was near frozen compared to when it was 66°F.
Third, promote exercise during cold winter months. Exercise provides multiple benefits by increasing metabolism and improving intestinal motility.  Fiber digestibility increases by up to 20% in exercised horses, promoting greater retention of the fluid part of the diet and shortened retention of the more formed, particulate part of the feed.

Wind, cold, rain, snow, ice…huge temperature surges. Don’t act like Mother Nature in your horse management.  Be consistent and sensible. And remember: Educated choices are economical choices.

CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR CLINIC.
I am here with gratitude, for you and your horses,
Dr. Chrysann

Monday, September 3, 2018

Fall 2018 News and Notes


High Desert Veterinary Service

Chrysann Collatos VMD,PhD,DipACVIMLA

775-969-3495 (Office)           742-2823 (Cell)
hidvet@gmail.com      HighDesertEquine.com
Building Healthy Partners

Summer’s end greetings to everyone,
     Our animals step up for us every day, sometimes in little ways, sometimes as champions.  They never expect anything in return. Our responsibility is to give back what they offer, to keep them safe and healthy.
Your Fall Clinic appointment is an important part of your horses’s preventive health care program.  See you soon!
Dr. Chrysann
Fall Clinic Schedule

Routine Fall exam includes flu/rhino vaccination, deworming or fecal examination, annual dentistry consult, and sheath cleaning.  Also consider Microchipping!
To reserve an appointment, call 775 969 3495 with:
  • Your Name, Phone # and Clinic Date
  • Number of Animals, and Services wanted
Your call won’t be returned until three days before your clinic when we will give an estimated time of arrival at your address.  Please be sure horses are caught and haltered 30 minutes beforehand!
Location                                                    Date
Rancho Haven/Sierra Ranchos1       Fri Sept 7 Rancho Haven/Sierra Ranchos2                    Sat Sept 15
Red Rock North/Silver Knolls 1         Fri Sept 7
Red Rock North/Silver Knolls 2         Sat Sept 15
Span Springs/Palomino Valley 1        Fri Sept 14
Span Springs/Palomino Valley 2        Sat Sept 22
Antelope/Golden/Lemmon Valley 1   Sat Sept 8
Antelope/Golden/Lemmon Valley 2   Fri Sept 21  
South & West Reno 1                        Fri Sept 21
South & West Reno                            Sat Sept 29
Discounted prices ONLY AVAILABLE Clinic Day
Farm Call (per location)              $11.00
Wellness Exam (mandatory)     $15.00
West Nile                                        $33.00
FluRhino                                          $30.00
Strangles Intranasal                     $34.00
Rabies                                              $23.00
Tetanus/ Encephalitis                 $19.00
Ivermectin Deworm                    $16.00
Coggins Test                                 $29.00
Sheath Clean w/sedation           $45.00
Fecal parasite exam                    $19.00
Pre-registered microchip            $39.00

COLIC –
What YOU Can Do
We all dread seeing a horse with colic. Despite my 30 years of veterinary experience, I can’t guarantee that your horse will recover uneventfully. But YOU can make a difference.
I looked back at the first 25 horses I treated for colic last year. Of the 25, 6 (24%) experienced complications that required repeated visits or hospitalization and 4 (16%) did not survive. The average cost for a single visit with uncomplicated recovery was $300.
Early, specific veterinary intervention is the key to successful treatment of colic.  Your ability to get temperature, pulse, respiration, and evaluate gut sounds and gum color at the onset of a colic episode can provide information critical
to your veterinarian’s treatment decision process. All you need is an inexpensive stethoscope and a thermometer. Here is a link to a good article in TheHorse.com https://thehorse.com/14385/the-basic-physical-examination/.  Ask me to review your physical exam skills at your fall clinic appointment. I am happy to help!
Signs of colic (in order of severity):
Ø  Poor appetite
Ø  Reduced manure production
Ø  Lying down more than normal
Ø  Stretching out as if trying to urinate
Ø  Pawing, looking at flank
Ø  Getting up and down, rolling
Understanding Equine Metabolic Syndrome & Laminitis

Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) has become a household word for many horse owners.  As we discuss this complicated syndrome, keep this KEY POINT in  mind:  horses with EMS do not handle sugar and carbohydrate normally.  Therefore, strict dietary management is essential for successful treatment. 

Horses with EMS tend to be overweight, with an abnormal distribution of body fat.  A cresty neck, soft fatty lumps at the tail base, and an enlarged sheath or mammary gland are hallmark signs.  All horses with EMS are at high risk of laminitis, and often are first presented to a veterinarian with the complaint of sore feet.

Our bodies use sugar (glucose), carbohydrate, and fat as fuel. The hormone insulin directs the flow of these various fuels depending on the body's demands and the composition of the diet.  Carbohydrates are long chains of sugar molecules, present both in hay and grain.  When your horse eats, his blood sugar rises, triggering the production of insulin.  Insulin drives glucose from the blood into the tissues where it provides energy to meet metabolic demands.

Horses with EMS are insulin resistant.  The receptors on cells which normally are activated by insulin to take up glucose do not respond. Horses with EMS keep making insulin until they have enough to overcome the low sensitivity of cell receptors.  The result is a horse with normal blood sugar, but high insulin

So why is high blood insulin a problem?  Because insulin does a lot more than just control blood sugar.  Insulin  also plays important roles in regulating blood vessel constriction and cellular inflammation.  When EMS horses eat carbohydrate rich foods, they experience surges in insulin which can cause severe inflammatory responses in other tissues in the body.  Specifically, high insulin can cause devestating changes in blood flow and cellular activity within the hoof.  Laminitis is a painful condition that can result in permanent damage to the mechanical structure of the hoof.  In severe laminitis cases, unmanageable pain and mechanical tissue destruction can be fatal.

Let’s try to understand the connection between EMS and  laminitis more completely. Laminitis, commonly called founder, is an inflammatory condition. The horse’s outer hoof wall is connected to the deeper, sensitive tissues of the foot like a tongue and groove floor, where each layer interlocks in a repeating pattern. However, unlike a floor, the horse's foot is alive and in motion.  The hoof utilizes glucose at an exceptionally fast rate compared to other tissues in the horse’s body, constantly remodelling in response to the tremendous dynamic forces of the horse’s weight, and the effects of the environment .

For the foot to remain healthy, glucose must be able to reach the tissues bonding the hoof layers together. But remember, the EMS horse is insulin resistant. This creates a double-whammy for the hoof:
First, glucose transport is compromised by a poor response to insulin, impairing the energy supply to the living tissues of the hoof, and
Second, insulin, which constricts blood vessels and triggers inflammation, becomes abnormally high in an effort to improve energy supply, triggering damaging mechanical effects within the tissues of the hoof which already are starved for critical energy.

Careful dietary management is the key to successful treatment of horses with EMS. Our goal is to feed a diet composed of high quality energy sources with low glycemic index, reducing insulin surges while meeting metabolic demands.

Call today to schedule your  
Fall Clinic appointment!
HighDesertEquine.com
Building Healthy Partners.




Thursday, February 9, 2017

Spring 2017 News & Notes

High Desert Veterinary Service

Chrysann Collatos VMD,PhD,DipACVIMLA

775-969-3495 (Office)           742-2823 (Cell)
HighDesertEquine.com
Building Healthy Partners
Spring 2017 News & Notes

Ø Clinic Schedule
Ø Spring Hormonal Confusion!
Ø Some Advice on Drying Out
What a winter! Many of our horses have been unusually inactive due to environmental conditions. As the weather improves pay careful attention to your horse’s feet and haircoat. Mother Nature’s generous gifts of moisture and warm temperatures provide the perfect environment for infectious organisms that cause thrush, subsolar abscesses and “rain rot”. Please read this newsletter carefully and be proactive in keeping your animals healthy this year.
Amanda and I look forward to seeing you on one of our clinic days in March,
Dr. Chrysann
Spring Clinic Schedule
Routine Spring exams include  EWT, West Nile, and flu/rhino vaccination plus deworming or fecal examination, dentistry consult and sheath cleaning.  To reserve an appointment, call 775 969 3495 with:
  • Your Name, Phone # and Clinic Date
  • Number of Animals, and Services requested.
We will return your call three days before your clinic with an estimated time of arrival at your address.  Please be sure horses are caught and haltered 30 minutes beforehand!
Location                                                    Date
Rancho Haven/Sierra Ranchos1          Sat Mar 4 
Rancho Haven/Sierra Ranchos2          Fri Mar 10
Red Rock North/Silver Knolls 1            Sun Mar 5
Red Rock North/Silver Knolls 2            Sat Mar 18
Span Springs/Palomino Valley 1          Sat Mar 11
Span Springs/Palomino Valley 2          Fri Mar 17
Antelope/Golden/Lemmon Valley 1   Sun Mar 12
Antelope/Golden/Lemmon Valley 2   Sat Mar 25  
Sierra Valley                                             Sun Mar 26 
South & West Reno                                Fri Mar 24
Discounted prices ONLY AVAILABLE Clinic Day
Farm Call (per location)              $9.00
Wellness Exam (mandatory)     $14.00
West Nile                                        $32.00
FluRhino                                          $29.00
Rabies                                              $21.00
Tetanus/ Encephalitis                 $18.00
Ivermectin Deworm                    $14.00
Coggins Test                                 $27.00
Sheath Clean w/sedation           $45.00
Fecal parasite exam                    $18.00
Pre-registered microchip             $35.00
Dentistry Consult                       No Charge


Spring Transitional Period
(aka Crazy Mare Time)

 Last week a client called about a performance mare who kept posturing to urinate and looking back at her left flank, but had a great appetite and normal manure.  Another trainer called because a normally cooperative mare was kicking out when asked to canter.  Upon investigation, I discovered that both these mares’ problems were related to the seasonal nature of the equine reproductive cycle.

Seasonal variation in daylight has a profound influence on the mare’s reproductive performance.  Increasing day length improves the mare's reproductive efficiency while shortened days disrupt reproductive regulation.  Daylight stimulates the production of melatonin by the brain’s pineal gland, which in turn starts a complex cascade of hormonal events which influence the ovaries to develop and release follicles. For successful conception to occur, an egg must ovulate, be fertilized, and arrive in a uterus which is ready to accept and nourish it.  No simple task.

The transition from the short days of winter when most mares stop cycling all together, to the long days of June, when fertility is at its highest, is a gradual process.  During the spring and fall, mares enter a period of anovulatory receptivity, or the transitional period.  At this time, they often exhibit erratic estrus behavior, and while they appear to be in standing heat and accept a stallion, there often is not an associated ovulation of a mature follicle.  When a transitional mare does ovulate appropriately, if the hormonal sequence necessary to maintain  the critical early critical of pregnancy is unbalanced,  the embryo may be lost.  Particularly in the spring, this transitional period is characterized by long, erratic heat cycles without ovulation.

No wonder mares may act whacky in Feburary! Not only are they dealing with hormonal imbalance, they also may experience ovarian pain associated with large, non-ovulating follicles.

Mares with placid dispositions may not seem affected by the ups and downs of hormonal transitions while others are truly distressed during these phases. Some performance horses exhibit irritable behavior and are difficult to train.  Trainer’s may seek ways to stabilize reproductive activity and help these troubled mares achieve behavioral balance.  There are many oral supplements available over the counter which claim to improve the demeanor of irritable mares,and subcutaneous cattle hormonal implants have been used, but none of these methods have any scientific basis.  Compounded injectable progesterone in olive oil can be used intramuscularly but the injections are irritating and yield variable results. There is a well researched long acting altrenogest injection manufactured by BET Pharm, however the cost is prohibitive for many clients.

 The gold standard for preventing cycling remains the daily administration of oral Altrenogest, a synthetic progesterone (Regu-Mate or Altresyn).

Once the transitional period is over and mares are cycling regularly, reproductive efficiency rapidly improves. Performance horses exhibit improved behavior and brood mares conceive successfully. The "normal" mare has a 21 day heat cycle.  She is not receptive for 14-15 days (diestrus), then comes into heat for 4-7 days (estrus), ovulating 12-24 hours before behavioral signs of estrus disappear.

So, when your mare is acting like a maniac this month, remember that her behavior may be due to "raging hormones"! Speak with me about management practices that may improve your breeding success or help your mare's disposition.  


Some Advice on Drying Out

As the flood waters and ice recede, we are eager to get back in the saddle. Whatever your riding discipline, consider the consequences of this wet winter and get proactive!

Hoof Care  First and foremost: feet!  I see lots of shedding frogs, low heels and long toes in the spring.  This winter environmental cleanliness has been a real challenge, and many horses are standing in manure that goes through repetitive freeze/thaw cycles. Hooves develop callouses in response to harsh ice.  When the surface thaws, fecal bacteria seep into small defects in the thickened sole and frog, creating the perfect setup for thrush or subsolar abscessation. 

Preventive measures that MAKE A DIFFERENCE:
1) Get a hoof pick and wire brush  and thoroughly pick you horse’s feet every day!
2) Remove accumulated manure and organic material from pens and turn outs
3) Schedule a trim and consultation with your farrier!

Body Conditon As you get your horse’s feet in shape, start grooming!  Get that winter hair loose, check for any skin conditions and feel your horse’s back and barrel – is their body condition what you hope for?  Many horses gain or lose unnoticed weight under winter hair coats and blankets. Your spring clinic appointment is a good time to ask  Dr. Chrysann about your horse’s nutrition program.

Horses and humans alike, let’s dry out, get out, get moving, and look forward to a spectacular spring flower season in our high desert piece of heaven!


Call us today to schedule your

Spring Clinic Appointment.

I believe that education is the key to evolution. I believe that animals are the key to compassion. I believe the learning never stops.

Monday, September 5, 2016

Fall Clinics 2016

High Desert Veterinary Service

Chrysann Collatos VMD,PhD,DipACVIMLA

775-969-3495 (Office)           742-2823 (Cell)
hidvet@gmail.com      HighDesertEquine.com
Building Healthy Partners
Fall 2016 News & Notes:
Clinic Schedule
Smoke and your Horse
 Healing with Honey
Hello everyone,
                We all recognize this reality living in the dry high desert. I took this picture standing next to the horse trailer, preparing to evacuate horses from a client’s property. In the aftermath of emergency evacuation, a microchip can play a crucial role in reuniting horses and owners. Pease consider microchipping your horse this fall, and read more below about caring for your horse when faced with environmental heat and smoke challenges.
               
I am here to serve you and your equine companions, with over 25 years experience, and a profound commitment to building healthy partners,
Dr. Chrysann 

Fall Clinic Schedule
Routine Fall exams include flu/rhino vaccination plus deworming or fecal examination, an oral exam, and sheath cleaning.  Also consider Microchipping!
To reserve an appointment, call 775 969 3495 with:
  • Your Name, Phone # and Clinic Date
  • Number of Animals, and Services requested.
We will return your call three days before your clinic with an estimated time of arrival at your address.  Please be sure horses are caught and haltered 30 minutes beforehand!
Location                                                    Date
Rancho Haven/Sierra Ranchos1       Sat Sept 10 
Rancho Haven/Sierra Ranchos2       Fri Sept 16
Red Rock North/Silver Knolls 1         Fri Sept 9
Red Rock North/Silver Knolls 2         Sun Sept 18
Span Springs/Palomino Valley 1        Sat Sep 17
Span Springs/Palomino Valley 2        Fri Sept 23
Antelope/Golden/Lemmon Valley 1   Sun Sept 11
Antelope/Golden/Lemmon Valley 2   Fri Sept 30  
South & West Reno 1                        Mon  Sept 19
South & West Reno                         Sat Sept 24
Discounted prices ONLY AVAILABLE Clinic Day
Farm Call                                    $ 9.00
Wellness Exam (mandatory)      $14.00
West Nile                                     $32.00
FluRhino                                      $27.00
Rabies                                          $21.00
Tetanus/ Encephalitis                   $18.00
Ivermectin Deworm                        $14.00
Coggins Test                                  $27.00
Sheath Clean w/sedation               $45.00
Fecal parasite exam                       $18.00
Pre-registered microchip             $39.00


Healing with Honey

Wounds, especially those located below the  knee or hock, are notorious sources of frustration for horse owners and veterinarians alike. Understanding how wounds heal is the first step in designing an appropriate wound management plan; choosing a wound dressing that supports the body’s healing mechanisms is second.

1)       Immediately after a wound occurs, the body begins its own clean up process.  White blood cells migrate into the wound to eliminate foreign material, dead tissue and infectious agents. These cells exit the wound as pus.  PUS IS A NORMAL, HEALTHY RESPONSE TO A WOUND IN THE FIRST FEW DAYS.  It is important to keep the wound environment moist in this early healing period.
2)       Once the wound environment is clean, and dead tissue has been removed, the next healing phase involves rebuilding tissue.  The body builds a scaffold of collagen, and delicate new skin cells and blood vessels climb along this framework, repairing the wound defect.  During this phase, the wound should be protected from invasion by secondary bacteria, and inflammation should be minimized.
3)       Finally, the body spends a long time (months in severe wounds) strengthening and remodeling the fragile young tissue that has filled the wound.  Now it is important to keep the tissue pliable and soft with emollient substances like lanolin.
Our job is to enhance the cleaning and restructuring phases to decrease time to wound closure, improve cosmetic outcome, and avoid problems with exuberant granulation tissue (proud flesh) and wound infection.  This is where honey can be uniquely useful.  Honey is a biologic wound dressing; while each of its beneficial properties can be found individually in pharmaceutical products, only in honey are they all present together working in cooperation to enhance healing while maintaining a moist wound environment.
How does honey work? The high sugar content of honey draws water out of wounds and reduces edema (fluid swelling).  Honey is slightly acidic, which inhibits bacterial growth and acts with the high sugar content to pull water out of bacterial cells. Honey from Manuka trees in New Zealand has additional unique properties. Researchers at the University of Sydney studying the efficacy of Manuka honey in equine wound healing reported that Manuka honey treated wounds had healthier tissue regrowth, which they believe is related not only to its unique antibacterial effects of the honey, but also to Manuka honey’s positive influence on the horse’s immune system.
All types of honey possess beneficial wound healing qualities. The antibacterial activity of most honey’s is due to the presence of hydrogen peroxide, which can be inactivated by enzymes normally present in the healing wound. In contrast, the antibacterial component of manuka honey is a small water-soluble molecule, methylglyoxal, that diffuses easily through the wound environment, and is resistant to enzymatic degradation. This compound also penetrates the biofilm which forms in wounds, protecting bacteria from the action of many systemic and topical antimicrobial agents. Finally, Manuka honey is available in sterile, medical grade preparations. Non-medical grade honey often harbors bacteria that are not dangerous when used for food consumpution, but which can colonize wounds causing secondary bacterial infections.  For all of these reasons, medical grade Manuka honey products are the safest, most effective choice for wound treatment.

We recently used Manuka honey on this chronically infected hoof following a hoof wall resection. The healing of the disrupted coronary band was rapid and the integrity of the coronary band was completely restored.

Smoke and Your Horse

Smoke is an unhealthy combination of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, soot, hydrocarbons, and other organic substances. Smoke particulates can irritate horses’ eyes and respiratory tracts, and hamper their breathing.

The simplest thing you can do to limit the damaging effects of smoke on your horse’s airway is to limit your horse’s activity when smoke is visible.   Increased airflow and turbulence that accompany athletic activity can significantly increase the inflammation and damage to delicate cells lining the respiratory tract. In addition, if possible, misters and fans can be used to improve air quality in your horse’s environment.

Human air quality advisements can be applied to your horse as well.  If your eyes are burning and you smell and taste smoke, then assume that your horse is feeling as uncomfortable as you are.

Most importantly, when smoke has been particularly heavy, remember that it takes time for airways to recover fully. Four to six weeks can be required for airways to recuperate from severe smoke exposure, and early return to exercise can delay healing and increase the risk of long term airway damage.

The best way to combat heat and smoke is through hydration. You can:
  1. Provide clean, fresh water at all times
  2. Water your horse’s hay and feed grain as wet mashes
  3. Put sprinklers out in turn outs to reduce dust and smoke and increase moisture in the air

Call us today to schedule your  
Fall Clinic appointment and join us

Building Healthy Partners.


I believe that education is the key to evolution. I believe that animals are the key to compassion. I believe the learning never stops.

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